EXPERTS CONFIRM: The SNP have signed up to austerity worse than the Tories

The SNP’s manifesto fell apart today after the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) exposed the impact of full fiscal responsibility within the UK.

In a devastating report, the impartial and independent experts at the IFS said that by the end of the decade the gap in Scotland’s finances because of full fiscal responsibility is due to grow to £9.7 billion a year. The IFS conclude that “full fiscal responsibility would likely entail substantial spending cuts or tax rises in Scotland.”

The IFS also demolish the SNP’s repeated claim that the gap will be filled by increased economic growth and higher onshore receipts.  Rather than close the gap, the IFS conclude the SNP’s proposed tax cuts would “cost the government money, and widen rather than shrink the fiscal gap, even if they did boost growth.”


Full fiscal responsibility within the UK would mean all public spending in Scotland comes only from taxes raised in Scotland – and the scrapping of the Barnett formula.

Kezia Dugdale said:

“It’s no wonder the SNP have tried to hide the cost of their plan to cut Scotland off from UK-wide taxes, because the consequences of their reckless policy would be devastating. It would mean massive cuts in public spending for our NHS and schools, as well as an end to the UK-wide pension in Scotland.

“The experts at the IFS have confirmed what Labour said yesterday – the SNP’s manifesto means they have signed up to massive spending cuts that would make even the Tories blush.

“Each of the SNP’s claims has been demolished by the IFS.

“The SNP say we could delay implementing their own plan and that would make things better. The IFS say this isn't true and would only make things worse.

“Only Labour can bring an end to the failed Tory austerity and stop the years of pain that would come from the SNP’s plans. The only way to get a Labour Government that will invest in our NHS and make life fairer for working class families in Scotland is to vote Labour.”

Read our paper below, detailing how the SNP's claims fall down: